• [S1] Town of Cornwall, Ontario. 1829 Census of Cornwall. Town of Cornwall.
  • [S3] Government of Canada. 1851 Census of Canada. Library and Archives Canada
    The 1851 census includes the areas of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Canada East (Lower Canada, or roughly Quebec), and Canada West (Upper Canada, or roughly Ontario).

    Note: Not all of the 1851 census has survived, so this database does not contain a complete representation of the above areas. The missing areas are still listed in the browse portion of this database but are shown as non-links.

    For the 1851 census each province/colony was divided into census districts. These districts were subsequently divided into sub-districts. Districts were roughly equivalent to electoral districts, cities, and counties. Sub-Districts were based off of towns, townships, and survey land descriptions. Each District and Sub-District was assigned a number for administrative purposes. The District Number is unique only to the province in which it belongs and the Sub-District Number is unique only to the District in which it belongs.

    Enumerator Instructions:

    Different forms were used for the enumeration of Canada East and West, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia.

    In Canada East and West every person who sojourned in the house on the night of Sunday, 11 January 1852, as well as individuals who usually lived at the house, but were absent on that night, were to be enumerated. The following questions were asked by enumerators:
    Name
    Profession, trade, or occupation
    Birthplace (Those born of Canadian parents were denoted with an ‘F’)
    Religion
    Residence, if outside of limits (the address of those who were not enumerated ad their usual place of abode)
    Age at next birthday
    Gender
    Marital status
    Whether a coloured person
    Whether Native Canadian
    Whether actually a family member of the household
    Whether not a family member of the household
    Whether a member of the family, but not present
    Whether deaf and dumb, blind, or a lunatic
    Whether attending school
    Whether born during the year 1851
    Whether died during the year 1851
    If died, age and cause of death

    Other information regarding homes and buildings was also recorded.

    In Nova Scotia, the following information was obtained:
    Name of head of household
    Number of household members in various categories, including age and gender
    Whether deaf and dumb, blind, lunatic, or idiot
    Whether a Native Canadian
    Whether a coloured person
    Occupation
    Religion

    Additional information regarding buildings, properties, land, and various occupations and manufacturers was also obtained.

    In New Brunswick the following questions were asked:
    Name
    Gender
    Relationship
    Age
    Race – whether ‘White’, ‘Coloured’, or ‘Indian’
    Rank or occupation
    Date of entering the colony
    Whether sick or infirm

    Other information regarding homes and buildings was also recorded.
  • [S4] Government of Canada. 1861 Census of Canada. Library and Archives Canada
    Since Canada didn’t officially become a country until 1867, the first national census wasn’t held until 1871. The 1861 Census of Canada is a collection of five provincial censuses. Due to the poor quality of the original filming, some images are unreadable or very difficult to read. Not all of the 1861 censuses have survived.

    What Areas are Included:
    Censuses were taken throughout different times of the year in the provinces of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Canada East (Lower Canada, or roughly southern Quebec), and Canada West (Upper Canada, or roughly southern Ontario).

    We are currently missing records for the townships of South Dumfries, Oakland, Tuscarora, and Onondaga, and the village of Paris in Brant County, Ontario.

    In Canada East and West the census recorded the names of every person who abode in the house on the night of Sunday, January the 13th, 1861. This included both residents and transient passengers. Individuals who were absent the night of the 13th were to be enumerated in the place in which they were usually resident. The following questions asked by enumerators included:
    Name
    Profession, trade or occupation
    Birthplace
    Married during the year
    Religion
    Residence, if out of limits
    Age at next birthday
    Gender
    Marital status – married, single, widower, or widow
    Whether a colored person, mulatto, or Indian
    Whether a family member or non family member
    Whether an absent family member
    Whether deaf and dumb, blind, lunatic, or idiot
    Children attending school within the year
    Persons over 20 who cannot read or write
    Number and gender of births in 1860
    Number and gender of deaths in 1860 - Age and cause of death

    Other information regarding homes, buildings, farms, and businesses were also recorded.

    The New Brunswick census covered the entire province. The official enumeration date is said to have been August 15th. However, most of the enumerations were completed later that year. This census included the following questions:
    Name
    Gender
    Relationship to head of family
    Age
    Race and where born
    Rank or occupation
    Children at school within the year
    Whether sick, infirm, deaf and dumb, blind, lunatic or idiot
    Births in the previous year
    Deaths in the previous year
    Marriages in the previous year

    The Nova Scotia census covered the entire province and listed just the heads of households. The following information was obtained:
    Name of head of household
    Total number of males and females in the household according to age categories
    Number of births since March 30, 1860
    Number of deaths in the household since March 30, 1860 according to age categories
    Marital status
    Number of deaf and dumb, blind, lunatic, or idiot according to gender
    Number of individuals that cannot read and write according to age and gender categories
    Number of individuals married since March 30, 1860

    The census of Prince Edward Island enumerated the heads of families. The following information was recorded:
    Name of head of household
    Trade, profession, or occupation
    Number of males and females in the household according to age categories
    Number of deaf and dumb, blind and insane in each family
    Number who have not been vaccinated or had the small pox in each family
    Total number in each family (including servants and apprentices)
    Number of married and single persons in each family
    Number of your family married during the past year
    Number of births and deaths in your family during the past year
    Number of persons in the family associated with various religions

    Other questions regarding the family’s home and land were also asked.
  • [S6] Government of Canada. 1871 Census of Canada. Library and Archives Canada
    The 1871 census includes the four original provinces – Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Quebec, and Ontario. Due to the poor quality of the original filming, some images are unreadable or very difficult to read. As a result, some names may not appear in the index.

    For the 1871 census each province was divided into census districts. These districts were subsequently divided into sub-districts. Districts were roughly equivalent to electoral districts, cities, and counties. Sub-Districts were based off of towns, townships, and city wards. Each District and Sub-District was assigned a number for administrative purposes. The District Number is unique only to the province in which it belongs and the Sub-District Number is unique only to the District in which it belongs.

    The 1871 Census was begun on 2 April 1871. Answers to census questions were to reflect the individual’s status as of April 2nd, regardless of the day the enumeration actually took place.

    The following questions were asked by enumerators:
    Number of family, household, or institution in order of visitation
    Name of each person in family or household
    Sex (M = Male; F = Female)
    Age
    Born within the last twelve months
    Country or province of birth
    Religion
    Origin (Ethnic Background)
    Profession, occupation, or trade
    Married or Widowed
    Married within last twelve months
    Instruction – (1) going to school, (2) over 20 unable to read, (3) over 20 unable to write
    Infirmities – (1) deaf and dumb, (2) blind, (3) unsound mind.
  • [S8] Government of Canada. 1881 Census of Canada. Library and Archives Canada
    The 1881 census includes seven provinces - British Columbia, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Prince Edward Island, and Quebec – and the Northwest Territories, which at the time consisted of modern-day Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, northern Ontario, northern Quebec, Labrador, Yukon, Nunavut, and Northwest Territories.

    For the 1881 census each province was divided into census districts. These districts were subsequently divided into sub-districts. Districts were roughly equivalent to electoral districts, cities, and counties. Sub-Districts were based off of towns, townships, and city wards. Each District and Sub-District was assigned a number for administrative purposes. The District Number is unique only to the province in which it belongs and the Sub-District Number is unique only to the District in which it belongs.

    The 1881 Census was begun on 4 April 1881 and was to enumerate every individual in the country. Answers to census questions were to reflect the individual’s status as of April 4th, regardless of the day the enumeration actually took place. However, individuals who were absent on the day of enumeration were still to be counted in the place where they usually lived.

    The head of household was to be enumerated first, followed by other members of the household. The following questions were asked by enumerators:
    Number of family, household, or institution in order of visitation
    Name of each person in family or household on 4 April 1881
    Sex (M = Male; F = Female)
    Age
    Born within the last twelve months
    Country or province of birth
    Religion
    Origin (Ethnic Background) – “Indian” was used for people of Native descent
    Profession, occupation, or trade
    Married or Widowed
    Going to school
    Whether deaf and dumb, blind, or of an unsound mind.
  • [S9] Dakota Territorial Government. 1885 Dakota Territory Census. North Dakota State.
  • [S10] Government of Canada. 1891 Census of Canada. Library and Archives Canada
    The 1891 census includes seven provinces - British Columbia, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Prince Edward Island, and Quebec – and the Northwest Territories, which at the time was comprised of the districts of Alberta, Assiniboia East, Assiniboia West, Saskatchewan, and Mackenzie River. Other unorganized territories are also included.

    For the 1891 census each province was divided into census districts. These districts were subsequently divided into sub-districts. Districts were roughly equivalent to electoral districts, cities, and counties. Sub-Districts were based off of towns, townships, and city wards. Each District and Sub-District was assigned a number for administrative purposes. The District Number is unique only to the province in which it belongs and the Sub-District Number is unique only to the District in which it belongs.

    The 1891 Census was begun on 6 April 1891. The head of household was to be enumerated first, followed by other members of the household. The head of household was responsible for providing all of the information about the household to the enumerator. The following questions were asked by enumerators:
    Number of family, household, or institution in order of visitation
    Name of each person in family or household on 6 April 1891
    Relation to head of family or head of household
    Sex (M = Male; F = Female)
    Age
    Marital Status (Single, Married, Widowed, or Divorced)
    Country or province of birth
    Whether French Canadian
    Birthplace of father
    Birthplace of mother
    Religion
    Profession, occupation, or trade
    Employer
    Wage Earner
    Whether unemployed during the week preceding the census
    If an employer, state the average number of hands employed during the year
    Whether able to read and write
    Whether deaf and dumb, blind, or of an unsound mind.
  • [S12] Government of Canada. 1901 Census of Canada. Library and Archives Canada
    The 1901 census includes seven provinces - British Columbia, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Prince Edward Island, and Quebec; two territories - the Yukon Territory and the Northwest Territories*; and one district - the District of Keewatin.

    *In 1901 the Northwest Territories was comprised of these seven districts: Alberta, Assiniboia, Athabasca, Franklin, Mackenzie, Saskatchewan, and Ungava.

    For the 1901 census each province was divided into census districts. These districts were subsequently divided into sub-districts. Districts were roughly equivalent to electoral districts, cities, and counties. Sub-Districts were based off of towns, townships, and city wards. Each District and Sub-District was assigned a number for administrative purposes. The District Number is unique only to the province in which it belongs and the Sub-District Number is unique only to the District in which it belongs.

    The following districts in Quebec are currently missing from this database:
    Argenteuil
    Bagot
    Beauharnois
    Bellechase
    Berthier
    Likewise, there are several sub-districts that are missing or contain errors.

    The 1901 Census was begun on 31 March 1901. Enumeration was to be completed within 30 days. Individuals were to be enumerated at their usual place of abode, even if they were not at that residence on the night of enumeration. The head of household was to be enumerated first, followed by other members of the household. The head of household was responsible for providing all of the information about the household to the enumerator. The following questions were asked by enumerators:
    Number of family, household, or institution in order of visitation
    Name of each person in family or household on 31 March 1901
    Relation to head of family or head of household
    Sex (M = Male; F = Female)
    Colour
    W = White (people of European descent)
    R = Red (Native Canadians)
    B = Black (people of African descent)
    Y = Yellow (people of Japanese or Chinese descent)
    Marital Status (Single, Married, Widowed, or Divorced)
    Month and Date of Birth
    Year of Birth
    Age on Last Birthday
    Country or Place of Birth (if Canada, specify province or territory, add "R" for Rural and "U" for Urban; for people born outside of Canada, specify country)
    Year of immigration to Canada (or year moved to Canada from another country)
    Year of Naturalization
    Racial or Tribal Origin (traced through the father for those of European descent)
    Nationality
    Religion
    Profession or Occupation (if Retired, add "R")
    Living on Own Means (lived on income other than salary from work, i.e. annuities, pensions)
    Employer
    Employee
    Working on Own Account
    Working at Trade in Factory of in Home
    Months employed at Trade in Factory
    Months employed at Trade in Home
    Months employed in Other Occupation than in Trade in Factory or in Home
    Earnings from Occupation or Trade
    Extra Earnings (than from primary occupation or trade)
    Months at School in Year
    Can Read
    Can Write
    Can Speak English
    Can Speak French
    Mother Tongue (if spoken)
    Whether blind, deaf or dumb, or of an unsound mind
    More specific enumerator instructions are available on the Library and Archives Canada website.
  • [S13] Government of Canada. 1906 Census Western Canada. Library and Archives Canada
    The 1906 census included the provinces of Alberta, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan.

    For the 1906 census each province was divided into census districts. These districts were subsequently divided into sub-districts. Districts were roughly equivalent to electoral districts, cities, and counties. Sub-Districts were based off of towns, townships, and survey land descriptions. Each District and Sub-District was assigned a number for administrative purposes. The District Number is unique only to the province in which it belongs and the Sub-District Number is unique only to the District in which it belongs.

    Individuals were to be enumerated at their usual place of abode, even if they were not at that residence on the day of enumeration. The head of household was to be enumerated first, followed by other members of the household listed 'in regular order'. The head of household was responsible for providing all of the information about the household to the enumerator. The following questions were asked by enumerators:
    Number of family, household, or institution in order of visitation
    Name of each person in family
    Relation to head of family
    Sex
    Marital Status (Single, Married, Widowed, or Divorced)
    Age
    Country or Place of Birth
    Year of immigration to Canada
    Post Office Address (entered for the head of family only)

    Location information (section, township, range, and meridian) as well as livestock information (number of horses, milk cows, other horned or neat cattle, sheep and lambs, and hogs and pigs) were also recorded.
  • [S14] US Federal Government. 1910 US Census. National Archives and Records Administration
    The 1910 census includes all fifty U.S. states and Washington D.C., as well as Military and Naval Forces, and Puerto Rico.

    The 1910 Census was begun on 15 April 1910. The actual date of the enumeration appears on the heading of each page of the census schedule, but all responses were to reflect the individual's status as of 15 April, even if the status had changed between 15 April and the day of enumeration.

    The following questions were asked by enumerators:
    Location:
    Name of street, avenue road, etc.
    House number or farm
    Number of dwelling in order of visitation
    Number of family in order of visitation
    Name and Relation:
    Name of each person whose place of abode was with the family
    Relationship of person enumerated to the head of the family
    Personal Description:
    Sex
    Color or race
    Age at last birthday
    Marital status - whether single, married, widowed, or divorced
    If married, number of years of present marriage
    For mothers, number of total children born and number of children living
    Nativity:
    Place of birth
    Father's place of birth
    Mother's place of birth
    Citizenship:
    Year of immigration to United States
    Whether naturalized or alien
    Whether able to speak English; or if not, language spoken
    Occupation:
    Trade, profession, or particular kind of work done
    Industry, business, or establishment in which at work
    Whether employer, employee, or working on own account
    If an employee, whether out of work on 15 April 1910 and number of weeks out of work during 1909
    Education:
    Whether able to read
    Whether able to write
    Whether attended school any time since 1 September 1909
    Ownership of Home:
    Owned or Rented
    Owned free or mortgaged
    Farm or house
    Number of farm schedule (applies only to farm homes)
    Military:
    Whether a survivor of the Union or Confederate Army or Navy
    Disabilities:
    Whether blind (both eyes)
    Whether deaf and dumb
    There were separate Indian population schedules for 1910 in which the tribe and/or band was also recorded.
  • [S15] Government of Canada. 1911 Census of Canada. Library and Archives Canada
    The 1911 census includes nine provinces - Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, and Saskatchewan, and two territories - the Yukon Territory and the Northwest Territories.

    For the 1911 census each province was divided into census districts. These districts were subsequently divided into sub-districts. Districts were roughly equivalent to electoral districts, cities, and counties. Sub-Districts were roughly equivalent to towns, townships, and city wards.

    The 1911 Census was begun on 1 June 1911. Enumerators working in the Yukon Territory and Northwest Territories were allowed to begin before 1 June. Individuals were to be enumerated at their usual place of abode, even if they were not at that residence on the night of enumeration. The head of household was to be enumerated first, followed by other members of the household. The head of household was responsible for providing all of the information about the household to the enumerator. The following questions were asked by enumerators:
    Number of dwelling in order of visitation
    Number of family, household, or institution in order of visitation
    Name of each person whose place of abode was in the household
    Place of habitation
    Sex
    Relationship of person enumerated to the head of household
    Marital Status (Single, Married, Widowed, Divorced, or Legally Separated)
    Month of Birth
    Year of Birth
    Age at last birthday
    Country or Place of Birth (if Canada, specify province or territory)
    Year of immigration to Canada, if an immigrant
    Year of naturalization, if formerly an alien
    Racial or tribal origin
    Nationality
    Religion
    Chief occupation or trade
    Employment other than chief occupation or trade, if any
    Employer
    Employee
    Working on Own Account
    Where person is employed (e.g. "in drug store", "on farm", etc.)
    Weeks employed in 1910 at chief occupation or trade
    Weeks employed in 1910 at other than chief occupation, if any
    Hours of working time per week at chief occupation or trade
    Hours of working time per week at other occupation, if any
    Total earnings in 1910 from chief occupation or trade
    Total earnings in 1910 from other than chief occupation, if any
    Rate or earnings per hour, when employed by the hour
    Value of life or accident/sickness insurance
    Cost of insurance from 1 June 1910 - 1 June 1911
    Months at school in 1910
    Whether able to read and write
    Language(s) commonly spoken
    Cost of Education in 1910 for persons over 16 years old at college, convent, or university
    Whether blind, deaf or dumb, crazy or lunatic, idiotic or silly

    Note: An abbreviated version of the census form was used to enumerate unorganized areas such as the territories. These abbreviated forms contained a subset of the above listed questions. Therefore, all of the above listed information will not be available for all individuals enumerated in the census.
  • [S16] US Federal Government. 1920 US Census. National Archives and Records Administration
    The 1920 census includes all fifty U.S. states and territories, as well as Military and Naval Forces, the Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, and for the first time American Samoa, Guam, and the Panama Canal Zone.

    The 1920 Census was begun on 1 January 1920. The actual date of the enumeration appears on the heading of each page of the census schedule, but all responses were to reflect the individual's status as of 1 January, even if the status had changed between 1 January and the day of enumeration.

    The following questions were asked by enumerators:
    Name of street, avenue road, etc.
    House number or farm
    Number of dwelling in order of visitation
    Number of family in order of visitation
    Name of each person whose place of abode was with the family
    Relationship of person enumerated to the head of the family
    Whether home owned or rented; if owned, whether free or mortgaged
    Sex
    Color or race
    Age at last birthday
    Whether single, married, widowed, or divorced
    Year of immigration to United States
    Whether naturalized or alien
    If naturalized, year of naturalization
    Whether attended school any time since 1 September 1919
    Whether able to read
    Whether able to write
    Person's place of birth
    Mother tongue
    Father's place of birth
    Father's mother tongue
    Mother's place of birth
    Mother's mother tongue
    Whether able to speak English
    Trade, profession, or particular kind of work done
    Industry, business, or establishment in which at work
    Whether employer, salary or wage worker, or working on own account
    Number of farm schedule

    There are no separate Indian population schedules in the 1920 census. Inhabitants of reservations were enumerated in the general population schedules. Enumerators were instructed not to report servicemen in the family enumerations but to treat them as residents of their duty posts. The 1920 census includes schedules for overseas military and naval forces.
  • [S17] US Federal Government. 1930 US Census. National Archives and Records Administration
    The 1930 census began on 2 April 1930 for the general population of the United States. (The enumeration in Alaska began on 1 October 1929.) Regardless of when an individual was contacted, all responses were to reflect the status of the individual as of 1 April 1930.

    Enumerators (census takers) collected the following information for each household:
    Address (name of the street, avenue, or road; house number)
    Occupant (name of each person and their relationship to head of family)
    Residence (whether home is owned or rented; value of home; whether home is farm residence; whether home has a radio)
    Personal (sex, race, age, marital status, college attendance, ability to read and write, birthplace, and birthplace of parents)
    Citizenship (language spoken before coming to the United States; year of immigration; whether naturalized or alien; ability to speak English)
    Occupation (trade or profession; industry or business working in; class of worker; whether worked the previous day; line number of unemployment schedule)
    Military (whether veteran or not; war or expedition participated in)

    Note: Individuals in Alaska, and Indians were asked slightly different questions. For example, Indians were not asked about their mother’s country of origin, but which tribe she belonged to.

    Unique Features
    Servicemen were not recorded with their families in the 1930 census; they were treated as residents of their duty posts. If you’re looking for someone in the military, you should not assume they will be listed in their home town.
    Children that were born between the official start date of the census and the actual day of enumeration were not included. Individuals that were alive on the official start date of the census but deceased by the actual day of enumeration were included.
    Indians were included in the enumeration of the general population, though they were asked different questions than the general population.
  • [S18] Various. Ancestory Dot Com. Various
    This source was used generically for data found at ancestry.com often for data on user submitted family trees although it may have been used for other types of data.

    This source is considered obsolete and data referencing it will be re-referenced as time permits.
  • [S19] Various. Birth Record. Various
    Generic birth record citation. Birth records are church or state record of a birth. The specific source should be clear from the citation. The information included varies depending on the source and the time. Normally will include the location and the names of the parents.
  • [S20] Various. Border Crossing. Various
    Generic border crossing citation.
  • [S22] William Boyd. Comment. William Boyd
    A tag to hold commentary.
  • [S23] Unknown author. Cornwall Genealogical Centre. N.pub.
    Cross reference file held at the Cornwall Genealogical Centre. This repository is currently closed. William Boyd has photographic copies of the documents cited.

    The Cross reference file was prepared by volunteers from the documents available at the Centre as a summary of the findings for individuals in a number of documents.
  • [S24] Various. Cornwall Museum. Various
    This is a generic citation for documents held by the Cornwall Museum. The specifics of the citation will identify the source.
  • [S25] Various. Death Record. Various
    This is a generic citation for a death record. Death records could be church or state. Details are included with the specific citation.
  • [S26] Divorce Decree
    Generic divorce citation. Divorce to be either civil or church. Details to be included with the specific citation.
  • [S27] Members of the immediate family of William Boyd. Family. William Boyd
    This citation is for information provided by an immediate family member of William Boyd from their personal knowledge or records.
  • [S28] Ancestral File. Www.ancestry.com, unknown repository address.
  • [S31] Various. Genealogy Researcher. William Boyd
    This citation is for information provided by a professional or amateur genealogist or family historian for publishing on this web site. The citation will include the name or handle of the source.
  • [S32] Various. Grave Marker. Various
    This is a generic citation for information obtained from a grave marker. Details are provided with the specific citation.
  • [S34] Various. Internet. Various
    This is a general citation for information collected off the Internet. The specific citation may include more source details.

    It is intended that this citation only be used where a more appropriate source type isn't available.
  • [S35] Cruikshank and Watt. The History and Master Roll of the King's Royal Regiment of New York, Revised Edition. Global Heritage Press, 2006, 2010
    The book contains a collection of information that is further referenced in the book.
  • [S36] Various. Marriage Record. Various
    This is a generic citation for a marriage record. The record may be church or civil. Details will be included with the specific citation.
  • [S37] Various. Military Record. Various
    This is a generic citation for a military record. Details are included with the specific citation.
  • [S39] Various. Minden Tweedsmuir Collection. Minden Womens Auxillary
    The Minden Womens Auxillary was organized about 1912. The Tweedsmuir collection is a record of the history and families of Minden, Ontario and the surrounding region.
  • [S41] Various. Obituary. Various
    Generic obituary citation. Details are included with the specific citation.
  • [S42] Unknown author. Records Of Old Dutch Church of Kingston NY. N.pub.
  • [S43] US Federal Government. Social Security Death Index. Social Security Administration
    Social Security Administration, Social Security Death Index, Master File, : Social Security Administration.
  • [S46] Government of Canada. 1916 Census Western Canada. Library and Archives Canada
    The 1916 census included the provinces of Alberta, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan.

    For the 1916 census each province was divided into census districts. These districts were subsequently divided into sub-districts. Districts were roughly equivalent to electoral districts, cities, and counties. Sub-Districts were based off of towns, townships, and survey land descriptions. Each District and Sub-District was assigned a number for administrative purposes. The District Number is unique only to the province in which it belongs and the Sub-District Number is unique only to the District in which it belongs.

    Questions Asked:
    Number of family, household, or institution in order of visitation
    Name of each person in family
    Military service
    Place of habitation (township, range, meridian, and municipality)
    Relation to head of household
    Sex
    Marital Status (Single, Married, Widowed, or Divorced)
    Age
    Country or place of birth
    Religion
    Year of immigration to Canada
    Year of naturalization
    Nationality
    Race
    Can speak English
    Can speak French
    Other language spoken as mother tongue
    Can read and write
    Occupation
    Employment.
  • [S47] Anglican Church. Cornwall Trinity Anglican Church Index of Register., 1990.
  • [S48] Various. Newspaper. Various
    Generic citation for information found in a newspaper article.
  • [S50] Death Index.
    Generic citation for an index of deaths.
  • [S51] Marriage Index. Online unknown url.
  • [S52] Unknown repository address. Will. Unknown testator. Unknown repository.
  • [S55] Unknown author. Family Search IGI/FGR Record. N.pub.
  • [S56] Unknown author. On-Line Family Tree. N.pub.
  • [S60] Unknown author. Land Petition. N.pub.
  • [S63] Henry Z Jones. Palatine Families. N.p.: n.pub.
  • [S64] Unknown repository address. Unknown repository. Baptismal Record.
  • [S65] Unknown author. Book. N.pub.
  • [S66] Unknown compiler. Directory. N.p.: n.pub.
  • [S67] US Federal Government. 1940 US Census. National Archives and Records Administration
    Enumerators were instructed to “visit every house, building, tent, cabin, hut, or other place in which any person might live or stay, to insure that no person is omitted from the enumeration” and to count “each person alive at the beginning of the census day, i.e., 12:01 A.M. on April 1, 1940.”

    Census enumerators wrote "Ab" after names of people who belonged to the household but were absent on April 1. Visitors were to be counted as members of the household at their normal place of residence, as were students, patients at hospitals and sanitariums who had a permanent home, and servants and household employees who did not sleep on the premises.

    Enumerators recorded answers for the following questions on the 1940 census:
    address
    home value and whether owned or rented
    name of each person whose usual place of residence on 1 April 1940 would be in the household
    relationship to head of household
    sex
    color or race
    age at last birthday
    marital status
    education
    place of birth
    citizenship
    residence on 1 April 1935
    employment status for those 14 and older (several questions)
    occupation and number of weeks worked full-time in 1939
    income in 1939

    Enumerators also asked supplementary questions to provide a random sample of about 5 percent of the population. These questions included
    birthplace of mother and father,
    native language,
    veteran status (including widow or minor child of a veteran),
    Social Security details,
    occupation, industry, and class of worker,
    marriage information for women (married more than once, age at first marriage, number of children).
  • [S72] Unknown author. Land Transfer. N.pub.
  • [S75] Government of Canada. 1921 Census of Canada. Library and Archives Canada
    For the 1921 census, each province was divided into census districts. These districts were divided into sub-districts. Districts were roughly equivalent to electoral districts, cities, and counties. Sub-districts were typically towns, townships, and city wards.

    June 1, 1921, was the date for the 1921 census. Not every census form was filled out on that day, but questions were to be answered based on that date. For the 1921 census, enumerators recorded answers to the following questions:
    -number of dwelling in order of visitation
    -number of family, household, or institution in order of visitation
    -name of each person whose place of abode was in the household
    -place of habitation
    -tenure and class of home (owned or rented, rent paid, class of house, house occupied by family)
    -sex
    -relationship of person enumerated to the head of household
    -marital status (single, married, widowed, divorced, or legally separated)
    -age at last birthday
    -country or place of birth (if Canada, specify province or territory)
    -country or place of birth for person’s father and mother
    -year of immigration to Canada, if an immigrant
    -year of naturalization, if formerly an alien
    -racial or tribal origin
    -nationality (country to which person owes allegiance)
    -can speak English
    -can speak French
    -religion
    -can read and write
    -months at school since September 1, 1920
    -chief occupation or trade
    -employment other than chief occupation or trade, if any
    -employer, employee, worker, or working on own account
    -principal product, where employed (e.g., ‘in drug store’, ‘on farm’, etc.), or nature of work
    -total earnings in past 12 months
    -currently out of work
    -number of weeks unemployed in past 12 months
    -number of weeks unemployed in past 12 months because of illness

    Note: Forms for the Prairie Provinces differed slightly, and an abbreviated version of the census form was used to enumerate unorganized areas such as the territories. These abbreviated forms contained a subset of the questions on the long version of the census, so not all of the information listed above will be available for everyone enumerated in the census.
  • [S77] Unknown author. 1891 Census of England. N.pub.